You’re Our Ally

One of the most important goals we have in working with your child is to engage you as our ally and partner in the process. We invite you to provide observations, while at the same time be open to our feedback. Regular and direct communication between us is a vital part of the treatment.

Raising children is not only difficult, it’s pretty darn scary. I know. I have three of them. As much as I love and enjoy my kids, there is not a day that goes by that I don’t worry about them, so I understand that the welfare of your child is paramount.

We understand that you want the best for your child and are committed to nurturing and developing their personal growth. Given that fact, we want to respect your feelings and concerns and welcome you to communicate with us about anything you have questions about or are uncomfortable with.

The aim is for us to communicate openly and honestly with one another throughout the treatment process, even though it may be challenging at times. We want to be your ally in your child’s treatment, as well as your partner in doing what’s best for your child and your family.

Here is how you help us do what we do:

1. Communicate openly with us

When you bring your child to our practice, we understand you are taking a risk that requires enormous trust and a willingness to voice your concerns. We want to hear from you — your part in the process is vital.

2. Know that real change happens slowly.

This process isn’t linear; it’s typically two steps forward, one step back. Think marathon, not sprint.

3. Recognize and reinforce positive change

Acknowledge positive changes in your child, no matter how small. Celebrate them and then remind yourself of the successes whenever your child loses his footing.

4. Be open to making changes in yourself

There is no definitive manual for parents —much of parenting is an intuitive endeavor. So, when your child doesn’t respond in a “typical” fashion, it can feel like you’ve failed. Make flexibility your friend. Be open to shifting your perspective and adjusting to the needs of your child.

5. Communicate optimism even when you don’t feel particularly optimistic

Reinforce the positive even when think you’re not seeing enough progress. Thinking optimistically makes a difference for you, and your child.

The aim is for us to communicate openly and honestly with one another throughout the treatment process, even though it may be challenging at times. We want you to be our ally in your child’s treatment, and see us as your partner in doing what’s best for your child and your family.